CG-5 Equatorial Mount – Work in progress

Just finished the other half of the mount.
This is called the RA (Right Ascension) axis.
I don’t know yet whether I’m going to put materials for the final video or not…i kinda like this uniform white shading.
I’d like to thank Jeff DeTray (Astronomy Boy from the previous post) and Skylive community for the support.
For my fellow 3D professionals, this time I’ve added some wireframe renderings of the RA housing (the other components are pretty uninteresting). The first two show the entire object that I’ve managed to model as a single mesh, the third shows only a half with the red faces pointing inside and the blu ones pointing outside.
As always, holes are rather messy but at least they are 100% boolean free.

CG-5 Equatorial Mount – Work in progress

I just started on a new project.
For those of you who don’t know, an equatorial mount is a mechanical device used with telecopes that serves to easily follow the apparent movement of stars.
Since my own equatorial mount, a Celetron CG-5, needed a little bit of cleanup and polishing, i disassembled it following the excellent guide written by Astronomy Boy (Astronomy Boy CG-5 Improvements). Nevertheless, i had a hard time figuring out how to practically do it, not having the faintest idea of both how the mechanical parts were assembled and how the whole thing worked in the first place (photos were kinda helpful, but unfortunately it was harder than i imagined). That’s why i decided not to let my 3D expertise go to waste and making instead a how-to video on CG-5 disassembling.
So far I’ve modeled in detail the relevant parts of the declination axis (let’s say about a half of the mount). I remained as low poly as possible to reduce the rendering time. In fact i’m considering smoothing out the geometry of the threaded parts and to do it by bump or normal map. Anyway, this is what I’ve done so far.

Modeled and rendered in Cinema 4D